2015 Joint Assembly Press Conference Schedule

Please scroll down below the table to see the complete listing of press conferences, including participants’ names and relevant session numbers.

Monday, 4 MayTuesday, 5 May
8:00 - 9:00 AM:
Québec’s fraternal twin craters
9:00 - 10:00 AM:
Photos from the future depict vegetation, snow cover changes
10:30 - 11:30 AM:
Climate change and winemaking in Quebec
10:30 - 11:30 AM:
Latest scientific results from the Mount Polley mine failure
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM:
The first images of thunder
1:00 - 2:00 PM:
Ontario water contamination

2015 Joint Assembly Press Conferences



Québec’s fraternal twin craters
Monday, 4 May
8:00 a.m.

For 50 years, East Clearwater Lake and West Clearwater Lake in Québec have been considered typical twin craters formed simultaneously by the impact of a pair of asteroids. But new radiometric dating of rocks, paleomagnetic evidence and a detailed look at the impact sites by researchers in Canada, Germany and Australia suggest there might be a different story to how and when these craters formed.

Participant:
Gordon “Oz” Osinski, Director, Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration, Western University of Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Session: P11A



Photos from the future depict vegetation, snow cover changes
Monday, 4 May
9:00 a.m.

Researchers have enlisted the aid of self-learning computer algorithms to predict effects of climate change on vegetation in three large swaths of the United States. The machines were first trained to generate faux satellite images closely matching today’s real ones from actual environmental data. Then, they projected some 50 years ahead using climate model data to render satellite photos from the future. The images suggest dramatic changes in store – both in vegetation and snow cover.

Participant:
Marc Stieglitz: Associate Professor, School of Civil and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A

Session: B14A



Climate change and winemaking in Quebec
Monday, 4 May
10:30 a.m.

As average high temperatures continue to increase, new regions at northern latitudes may become more favorable for growing wine-making grapes. Researchers will discuss new models of the future wine-making potential of Canada’s Québec province, looking out to 2040-50.

Participants:
Philippe Roy, Climate scenarios specialist, Ouranos  Consortium on Regional Climatology and Adaptation to Climate Change, Montreal, Quebec, Canada;
Isabelle Charron, Climate scenarios specialist, Ouranos  Consortium on Regional Climatology and Adaptation to Climate Change, Montreal, Quebec, Canada;
Évelyne Barriault, Agronome, Conseillère en arboriculture fruitière et viticulture MAPAQ, direction régionale de la Montérégie-Ouest, Saint-Jean sur Richelieu, Québec, Canada.

Session: AS21B



Latest scientific results from the Mount Polley mine failure
Tuesday, 5 May
10:30 a.m.

On August 4, 2014, the impoundment wall of the tailings pond at the Mount Polley copper and gold mine in British Columbia failed. The breach released approximately 25 billion liters of water, mine waste and other materials into nearby waterways, including near-pristine Quesnel Lake, the largest freshwater fjord lake in North America. A panel of scientists from the University of Northern British Columbia will present their latest findings on the impact of the disaster on the aquatic environment.

Participants:
Ellen Petticrew: Professor, Research Chair in Landscape Ecology, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada;
Phil Owens: Professor, Research Chair in Landscape Ecology, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada;
Stephen Déry: Canada Research Chair in Northern Hydrometeorology, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.

Session: H31C



The first images of thunder
Tuesday, 5 May
11:30 a.m.

For the first time, scientists have “imaged” thunder, visually capturing the sound created by artificially-triggered lightning, including how sound radiates along the length of a lightning bolt. Researchers will share the first such image, and also discuss lightning mechanics and the art of triggering artificial lightning using model rockets.

Participants:
Maher A. Dayeh, Research scientist, Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.;
Joseph R Dwyer, Professor and Peter T. Paul Chair, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, U.S.A;
Douglas M. Jordan, Director of Operations, International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, U.S.A.

Session: AS31A


Ontario water contamination
Tuesday, 5 May
1:00 p.m.

Everyday chemicals can find their way into waterways, potentially affecting the aquatic environment. In this panel, scientists will present new findings about artificial sweeteners and chloride from road salt in rivers, streams and watersheds in Ontario.

Participants:
Claire Oswald: Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada;
Kristen Leal: Masters Candidate, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada;
Sherry Schiff, Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada;
Catherine Eimers, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.